Summer Intern Program2019-04-12T14:58:21+00:00

Summer Intern Program

Student Interns for Research and Scholarly Activities

Note: All dates are subject to change and will be updated as needed.

Please see forms below to initiate proposal, project commitment and final report (abstracts).

Questions? Contact Lisa Adams at kla90@shp.rutgers.edu or 973-972-6524.

Stipends are provided to SHP Students to work on Research or a Scholarly Activity Project with SHP Faculty Members during the summer.  Examples of Scholarly Activity may include abstract, manuscript preparation, library research, presentation (invited, national regional), book chapter or book review, conference paper or software program as in a survey research.

Summer Intern Projects 2019

Faculty Contact Information:

Faculty Name:  Allison M. Brown, PT, PhD
Department/Program:  Physical Therapy
E-mail: Brown46@shp.rutgers.edu

Project Detail:

Project Title: (56 characters max) Cadence and ground reaction forces over a fatiguing run in injured and healthy runners.
Hypothesis: Hypothesis 1: Changes in cadence over a fatiguing run will predict changes in ground reaction force data.

Hypothesis 2: Injured runners’ changes in cadence and ground reaction forces will differ from healthy runners.

Hypothesis 3: Runners with a history of injury will demonstrate cadence and ground reaction force changes that are different from healthy runners with no history of injury and different from currently injured runners.

Description:
(Include design, methodology, data collection, techniques, dataanalysis to be employed, evaluation and interpretation methodology  for research component)
This proposal will be a cross sectional study design aiming to examine the effects of fatigue on running cadence and ground reaction forces in both injured and healthy runners. Once IRB approval is obtained, the protocol will include recruitment of injured and healthy runners. Runners will perform a run to fatigue for the duration of 45 minutes to one hours. During the fatiguing run, the Load Sol devices will be worn in the subjects’ shoes and will collect ground reaction and cadence data. A two-way ANOVA will be used to examine for an interaction between group (injured vs. healthy) and time points (pre- vs. post-fatigue).
Specific Student Responsibilities: The student will primarily be responsible for performing literature review on the topic and will be assisting in writing the IRB proposal. It is anticipated that the IRB will be submitted during the summer internship. Depending on the timing of IRB review, student responsibilities may also include addressing IRB comments from the review process.

As this will be the first time we will be using the Load Sol devices for running data collection, student responsibilities will also be developmental in nature including tasks such as developing investigator competence in calibration of and collection of data with the Load Sol devices. Further developmental responsibilities will include methodological work to refine the data collection techniques (Load Sol data collection and data analysis).

It is not anticipated that the study will receive IRB approval during the internship period, but should approval be granted, the student will also initiate subject recruitment.

Start / end date of project: This project is anticipated to run from 7/5/19 until 8/9/19 (6 weeks) but is flexible and could be extended out to 7 or 8 weeks if needed by the student.

Educational:

WHAT OTHER EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES ARE AVAILABLE TO STUDENTS?
(e.g., journal club, seminars, clinic, rounds)
The student will participate in a weekly lab-meeting in conjunction with members of the research team for Drs Carrie Esopenko and Ellen Anderson. These members include research assistants, PhD students and summer students. In this lab meeting, the student will be offered opportunities to read, present and discuss pertinent literature regarding running cadence and running kinetics along with discussing other areas of research relevant to Drs Esopenko and Anderson.
WHERE DO YOU PLAN TO PRESENT OR PUBLISH THE FINDINGS WITH THE STUDENT?
(e.g., national or state meetings, newsletter or journal, SHP poster day)
 It is expected that these findings will be presented at national conferences such as the American Society of Biomechanics Annual Meeting or the American Physical Therapy Association Combined Sections Meeting as well as the SHP poster day. In addition, it is anticipated that one manuscript from this work will be submitted for publication in a relevant journal such as Clinical Biomechanics or the Journal of Orthopedic and Sports Physical Therapy.

Faculty Contact Information:

Faculty Name:  Evan T. Cohen, PT, MA, PhD, NCS
Department/Program:  Rehab and Movement Sciences-DPT South (Blackwood)
E-mail: cohenet@shp.rutgers.edu

Project Detail:

Project Title: (56 characters max) Comparison of Three Measures of Upper Extremity Function in Multiple Sclerosis.
Hypothesis: 1.    One of the outcome measures of upper extremity function will be superior in predicting overall measures of function including employment status in people with multiple sclerosis
Description: (Include design, methodology, data collection, techniques, data analysis to be employed, evaluation and interpretation methodology  for research component) Upper extremity (UE) dysfunction is common in people with multiple sclerosis (pwMS), and can have a marked impact on activity and participation. It is important for clinicians to use outcome measures (OM) that not only provide information regarding clinical status, but can predict useful correlates, and have high clinical utility (i.e. they are simple and inexpensive to conduct). Three such OMs are the 9-Hole Peg Test (9HPT), Box and Block Test (BBT), and Finger-to-Nose Test (FTN). The purpose of this project is to establish cut-off scores and classification accuracy of the 9HPT, BBT, and FTN in predicting the Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH), Functional Status Index- Assistance portion (FSI-A), Test d’Evaluation de la performance des Membres Supérieurs des Personnes Âgées (TEMPA), and Employment Status (ES) in a sample of pwMS.
  Specific Student Responsibilities:  The primary responsibility will be to conduct a systematic review of the literature pertaining to measurement of upper extremity function in people with MS. This will include a database search, compilation of a list of relevant publications, evaluation of these publications for threats to internal validity, and the development of a table of data extracted from these publications.
Start / end date of project:  July 1, 2019 – August 31, 2019

Educational:

WHAT OTHER EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES ARE AVAILABLE TO STUDENTS? (e.g., journal club, seminars, clinic, rounds) There may be the opportunities to observe other departmental research projects and to collaborate with other students working in the lab.
WHERE DO YOU PLAN TO PRESENT OR PUBLISH THE FINDINGS WITH THE STUDENT? (e.g., national or state meetings, newsletter or journal, SHP poster day) Multiple Sclerosis Journal or Multiple Sclerosis International

Faculty Contact Information:

Faculty Name: Carrie Esopenko
Department/Program: Rehabilitation and Movement Sciences
E-mail: carrie.esopenko@rutgers.edu

Project Detail:

Project Title: (56 characters max)  Effect of TBI in survivors of intimate partner violence
Hypothesis:  We expect that TBI will be associated with increased severity of psychiatric comorbidities in female survivors of intimate partner violence (IPV).
Description: (Include design, methodology, data collection, techniques, data analysis to be employed, evaluation and interpretation methodology  for research component)  This study uses semi-structured clinical interviews to determine whether IPV-related TBI increases the severity of psychiatric problems, cognitive impairment, and brain damage in FS-IPV with TBI compared to those without exposure to physical violence.   Interviews will be conducted by Dr. Esopenko and will be audio recorded and transcribed by a research assistant/SHP intern student and quality checked by another research assistant/student.   Thematic analysis will occur in the following steps: 1) Transcribed interviews will be reviewed by study team and uploaded into NVivo 11, a qualitative analysis software; 2) Data will be coded into categories with researcher agreement on the coding framework; 3) The categories will be analyzed for themes with team debriefing and researcher agreement on themes discerned; 4) The qualitative themes and quantitative outcomes will be converged in matrix tables and case profiles, and the research team will examine the data for patterns; 5) Themes and quantitative outcomes will be connected to create a model of recovery mediators and outcomes.
  Specific Student Responsibilities:  Student will be responsible for transcribing audio recorded interviews, checking of transcriptions, and developing categories for initial coding steps.
Start / end date of project:  06/01/2019 – 08/30/2019

Educational:

WHAT OTHER EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES ARE AVAILABLE TO STUDENTS? (e.g., journal club, seminars, clinic, rounds)  Student will participate in bi-weekly lab meetings where they will be required to present a journal article effect of TBI in IPV or give an update on data analysis. Student will be required to present twice during the 6-8 week summer session.
WHERE DO YOU PLAN TO PRESENT OR PUBLISH THE FINDINGS WITH THE STUDENT? (e.g., national or state meetings, newsletter or journal, SHP poster day)  Students will be given the opportunity to present the data at local conferences (e.g., APTANJ) and the SHP student poster day at SHP.   This data will also be submitted for presentation at the North American Brain Injury Society annual meeting in February 2019.   Further, this work will be used as pilot data for a NINDS R21 grant resubmission.

Faculty Contact Information:

Faculty Name: Joachim Sackey
Department/Program: Department of Clinical and Preventive Nutrition Sciences
E-mail: Joachim.sackey@rutgers.edu

Project Detail:

Project Title: (56 characters max) Diet, food insecurity and drivers of food choice among adolescents and lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex (LGBTQI) individuals in Newark, NJ
Hypothesis: Characterizing and understanding diet quality, food insecurity and drivers of food choice will enable the development of locally viable, user-centered interventions to target these topics and improve health outcomes among adolescents and LGBTQI individuals in Newark, NJ.
Description: (Include design, methodology, data collection, techniques, data analysis to be employed, evaluation and interpretation methodology  for research component) This is a literature review (library research) that will involve systematically searching databases (PubMed, Medline, Web of Science, Scopus) and grey literature (dissertations, conference proceedings, reports). Data will be summarized in PICO (Population, Intervention, Comparison/Control, Outcome) summary tables.
  Specific Student Responsibilities: The student will be mentored in the : -Systematic search of published articles and grey literature. -Screening search results to determine eligible publications. -Summarizing key findings from eligible publications.
Start / end date of project: May 13, 2019 till July 21, 2019

Educational:

WHAT OTHER EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES ARE AVAILABLE TO STUDENTS? (e.g., journal club, seminars, clinic, rounds) -Session(s) with a librarian from the George F. Smith Library of the Health Sciences on systematic database search, screening etc. -Optional visit to future study site: North Jersey Community Research Initiative (NJCRI), 393 Central Ave, Newark, NJ 07103
WHERE DO YOU PLAN TO PRESENT OR PUBLISH THE FINDINGS WITH THE STUDENT? (e.g., national or state meetings, newsletter or journal, SHP poster day) -The literature reviewed will be used in a future grant application and could result in a systematic/narrative review publication. -The student will present their findings at SHP poster day.

Faculty Contact Information:

Faculty Name:  Judith Deutsch
Department/Program:  RMS
E-mail:  deutsch@rutgers.edu

Project Detail:

Project Title: (56 characters max)  Validation of the VSTEP Examination Suite and Progression Algorithm
Hypothesis: We hypothesize the participants post-stroke will have similar scores on their standardized assessments when collected by a master clinician and the VSTEP digital health platform.

We hypothesize that participants post-stroke will be able to exercise in the target heart rate zone more effectively with the VSTEP algorithm compared to the manipulation of the master clinician.

Description:
(Include design, methodology, data collection, techniques, dataanalysis to be employed, evaluation and interpretation methodology  for research component)
 This is a cross-sectional single cohort validation study.

Participants will be persons in the chronic phase post-stroke, cleared for exercise, who are able to walk moderate distance without assistance. After screening participants will attend a single data collection session. Gait speed (using the Gait Rite) will be measured to classify ambulation status. Following that participants will complete (in a counter balanced order) self-report and performance- based mobility tests administered by a master clinician and the VSTEP Digital Health platform. The final collection will be during interactive video game play under two counter-balanced conditions: with the algorithm and with the master clinician making exercise parameter adjustments. For part 1 scores on standardized tests will be tested for association and differences. For part two target heart rate, RPE and motivation will be compared using association and differences analyses.

Specific Student Responsibilities: Review of literature, recruitment, screening, data collection, data analysis, data interpretation and writing.
Start / end date of project:  As convenient to the student’s schedule

Educational:

WHAT OTHER EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES ARE AVAILABLE TO STUDENTS?
(e.g., journal club, seminars, clinic, rounds)
Journal club

Lab meetings

Interaction with visiting scientists or international collaborators

Interaction with other students in the lab. MD PhD, MS in Health Informatics engineering and computer science.

WHERE DO YOU PLAN TO PRESENT OR PUBLISH THE FINDINGS WITH THE STUDENT?
(e.g., national or state meetings, newsletter or journal, SHP poster day)
 Rehabilitation or Neural Engineering journals.

There will likely be intermediate dissemination opportunities to be determined as appropriate.

Faculty Contact Information:

Faculty Name: Laura D. Byham-Gray
Department/Program: Department of Clinical and Preventive Nutrition Sciences
E-mail: laura.byham.gray@rutgers.edu

Project Detail:

Project Title: (56 characters max) Image-Based Dietary Assessment in Chronic Kidney Disease
Hypothesis: This is not a hypothesis-driven project.  The data generated from this project will assist in securing external grant funding.
Description:
(Include design, methodology, data collection, techniques, dataanalysis to be employed, evaluation and interpretation methodology  for research component)
The National Institutes of Diabetes, Digestive & Kidney Diseases has a program announcement calling for grant proposals that focus on improving the accuracy and objectivity of assessing dietary intake.  Self-reported food diaries and logs, even with smartphone apps, are cumbersome and susceptible to error.  This project will prepare and photograph (e.g., stills and video) foods that can be linked to nutrient analyses data.  The goal is to generate a pilot database of food items that can be used in the development of a food recognition system as part of a unique and novel dietary intake assessment mechanism specifically geared for individuals diagnosed with chronic kidney disease.
Specific Student Responsibilities: Under faculty supervision, the student will complete the following activities, including but not limited to:

1.  Selecting food items to include in database

2.  Preparing food items (according to instructions)

3.  Staging the food items for the pictures/videos being mindful of portion sizes

4.  Taking still pictures and videos of the food items using appropriate technology.

5.  Uploading photos and videos into secured, password-protected research database.

6.  Completing the nutrient analysis of the prepared food item and storing the files in the secured, password-protected research database.

Start / end date of project: June 15, 2019-August 15, 2019

Educational:

WHAT OTHER EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES ARE AVAILABLE TO STUDENTS?
(e.g., journal club, seminars, clinic, rounds)
The student will learn more about the technologies needed to label the data for the image-based dietary assessment and will develop the prototype needed for the NIDDK grant submission.
WHERE DO YOU PLAN TO PRESENT OR PUBLISH THE FINDINGS WITH THE STUDENT?
(e.g., national or state meetings, newsletter or journal, SHP poster day)
We will publish our methodology and procedures for designing the initial components of the image-based dietary assessment in appropriate journals, and will submit an abstract for the American Society for Nutrition Annual Meeting 2020.

Faculty Contact Information:

Faculty Name: Jean-Francois Daneault
Department/Program: Department of Rehabilitation and Movement Sciences
E-mail:  jf.daneault@rutgers.edu

Project Detail:

Project Title: (56 characters max) Impact of dopaminergic tone on motor learning in children with cerebral palsy
Hypothesis: We hypothesize that specific genetic polymorphisms associated with dopamine transmission will affect motor learning in children with cerebral palsy.
Description:
(Include design, methodology, data collection, techniques, dataanalysis to be employed, evaluation and interpretation methodology  for research component)
Twenty subjects with cerebral palsy will be enrolled in the study which entails 2 visits to the lab (SSB-916). During one visit, subjects will learn a motor sequence task implicitly (they will not be told a priori that there is a sequence). During the other visit, subjects will be told that there is a motor sequence and will attempt to learn it. We will use a motion capture system to monitor movement patterns. Additionally, subjects will undergo a blood draw at the clinical research unit located at University Hospital and genetic phenotyping will occur at the medical school. We will assess whether subjects were able to learn the motor sequences, how quickly they learned it, and their moto patterns as they learned the task. We will then use statistical methods to assess whether there is a relationship between motor learning performance and genetic phenotypes.
Specific Student Responsibilities: Under faculty and/or graduate student supervision, the student will complete the following activities, including but not limited to:

  1. Recruit subjects
  2. Perform data collection
  3. Perform data pre-processing using pre-established analysis pipelines
  4. Enter data collected using pen and paper (i.e. demographics, patient history) into proper electronic formats.
  5. Perform basic statistical analyses on the dataset.
Start / end date of project:  June 15 2019 – August 15 2019

Educational:

WHAT OTHER EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES ARE AVAILABLE TO STUDENTS?
(e.g., journal club, seminars, clinic, rounds)
The student will earn about the analysis of motion capture data as well as the use of software for statistical analysis. The student will also be invited to join weekly lab meetings pertaining to other research projects in the lab. The student will also be encouraged to allocate some amount of time to participate in the numerous other research projects currently being performed in the lab.
WHERE DO YOU PLAN TO PRESENT OR PUBLISH THE FINDINGS WITH THE STUDENT?
(e.g., national or state meetings, newsletter or journal, SHP poster day)
We will publish the results of the study in an appropriate scientific journal that deals with motor learning such as Frontiers in Human Neuroscience. We will also submit an abstract to an appropriate conference such as Society for Neuroscience.

Faculty Contact Information:

Faculty Name:  Sandra L Kaplan
Department/Program:  Rehab and Movement Sciences
E-mail:  kaplansa@shp.rutgers.edu

Project Detail:

Project Title: (56 characters max) Outcomes of the Schroth Approach: A Retrospective Chart Review
Hypothesis:  This descriptive study will investigate the impact of selected characteristics on the outcomes of adolescents who were treated for scoliosis using the Schroth methodology.
Description:
(Include design, methodology, data collection, techniques, dataanalysis to be employed, evaluation and interpretation methodology  for research component)
Retrospective chart reviews of discharged patients, treated in the past 3 years, will be analyzed for frequencies of characteristics to describe the patients, and correlations and differences with selected characteristics. Data will be entered into Excel and analyzed with SPSS.
Specific Student Responsibilities: The student will be reviewing literature, harvesting data, entering data into Excel and assisting with analysis or data formatting depending on when data collection is completed. Opportunities for contributing to a manuscript  will depend on the student’s writing skills and understanding of the content. Applicants must have an understanding of scoliosis and the Schroth approach, critical literature review skills and be detail oriented.
Start / end date of project:  5/13/19 – 8/16/19

Educational:

WHAT OTHER EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES ARE AVAILABLE TO STUDENTS?
(e.g., journal club, seminars, clinic, rounds)
The student may attend a SHP and departmental research meetings where studies are presented for discussion.
WHERE DO YOU PLAN TO PRESENT OR PUBLISH THE FINDINGS WITH THE STUDENT?
(e.g., national or state meetings, newsletter or journal, SHP poster day)
 The manuscript will be submitted either to Spine, or Scoliosis and Spinal Disorders or Physical Therapy

Faculty Contact Information:

Faculty Name:  Adrienne H. Simonds, PT, PhD
Department/Program:  RMS / DPT-South
E-mail:  simondad@shp.rutgers.edu

Project Detail:

Project Title: (56 characters max) Reducing Opioid Consumption after Cesarean Section Delivery: TENS as a Complementary Therapy
Hypothesis: This ongoing pilot project will evaluate the effects of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) on intensity of incisional symptoms, pain medication usage and patient satisfaction with pain control in women after Cesarean Section (CS).  It is hypothesized that women using TENS will experience statistically significant reductions in intensity of incisional pain and pain medication usage.
Description:
(Include design, methodology, data collection, techniques, dataanalysis to be employed, evaluation and interpretation methodology  for research component)
This study is a pilot randomized interventional trial, registered at clinicaltrials.gov.  Participants will be randomly assigned to an invention or control group. The control group will receive usual care which is standard post-operative pain management with opioids and NSAIDS.  The intervention group will receive usual care plus TENS therapy beginning 8 hours after C-section and continuing to discharge. Both groups will receive medications for pain as requested or ordered by the doctor.

The following data points from the patient’s inpatient medical record will be extracted: pain scale scores, medication requests/prescriptions (including name, type, and amount), time to first bowel movement, subjective incision site complaints, and time to OOB. Participants will complete a survey before discharge which will solicit additional information about the postpartum recovery experience with or without TENS therapy. Differences between these primary and secondary outcomes will be compared within- and between-groups throughout the inpatient postpartum stay.

Specific Student Responsibilities:  1. Assist with data collection procedures at RWJUH-New Brunswick

2. Assist with manuscript and poster preparation (August 2019 deadline)

3. Be available in-person and via phone and email to study team for ongoing communication and report of activities.

Start / end date of project: Late May – mid-August (Flexible based on the student’s schedule and availability)

Educational:

WHAT OTHER EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES ARE AVAILABLE TO STUDENTS?
(e.g., journal club, seminars, clinic, rounds)
Study team meetings with physician, medical student, research coordinator and physical therapist; on-site opportunities at RWJUH-New Brunswick
WHERE DO YOU PLAN TO PRESENT OR PUBLISH THE FINDINGS WITH THE STUDENT?
(e.g., national or state meetings, newsletter or journal, SHP poster day)
 Maternal health peer-reviewed journal; Annual Maternal-Fetal-Medicine conference (Fall 2019)

Faculty Contact Information:

Faculty Name:  Weili Lu, PhD
Department/Program:  Psychiatric Rehabilitation
E-mail:  Luwe1@shp.rutgers.edu

Project Detail:

Project Title: (56 characters max)  Cognitive-behavioral treatment of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder among Clients in Supported Employment Programs: Analysis of Main Outcome and Secondary Outcomes (Four-Year-Study, funded by NIDILRR)
Hypothesis: Primary Hypothesis #1: Clients participating in I-CBT and SE services will have greater rates of employment, hours worked and wages earned than those participating in SE services alone.

Primary Hypothesis #2: Clients participating in I-CBT and SE will have greater engagement in SE services than those participating in SE services alone, as demonstrated by less no-shows.

Primary Hypothesis #3: Clients participating in I-CBT and SE will report greater self-efficacy toward employment than those participating in SE services alone.

Exploratory hypothesis #1: Clients participating in I-CBT and SE will show decreased negative trauma-related beliefs about self and the world than clients in SE services alone.

Exploratory Hypothesis #2: Clients participating in I-CBT and SE will have decreased PTSD symptoms from before treatment to the post-treatment and follow-up assessments compared to those receiving SE services alone.

Description:
(Include design, methodology, data collection, techniques, dataanalysis to be employed, evaluation and interpretation methodology  for research component)
 Background: Individuals with psychiatric disabilities experience a high rate of exposure to trauma, and the prevalence of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is estimated to be 28-43%. Nonetheless, PTSD is clearly underdiagnosed and undertreated in this population. In addition, the rehabilitation literature has consistently demonstrated that persons with PTSD have higher rates of unemployment and lower success rates in supported employment programs.

Target population, planned goals & objectives: The high prevalence of PTSD among persons with psychiatric disabilities and its association with poor employment outcomes suggests a clear need to use existing evidence based treatment for PTSD to help persons seeking employment in this population.  The purpose of this present study is to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of integrated Cognitive Behavioral Treatment for PTSD (I-CBT), a CBT intervention aimed at enhancing employment among the target population of individuals with psychiatric disabilities and comorbid PTSD who are receiving supported employment services.

Innovative strategies utilized: We adapted an evidence based CBT intervention previously proven to be effective for persons with psychiatric disabilities in reducing PTSD symptoms, and integrated it into supported employment. This randomized trial enrolled 130 participants with psychiatric disabilities and comorbid PTSD receiving employment services. Half of them received CBT while the other half received treatment as usual. This is a randomized controlled trial, pre-test/post-test design with repeated measures at baseline, post-treatment and at 12-months post-treatment. We randomized 130 clients with psychiatric disabilities and PTSD.  Clients were randomly assigned to Treatment Condition (I-CBT + SE) or Control Condition (SE as usual).  Assessment was conducted at baseline, post-treatment, and 12-month follow-ups.  Assessments included client interviews, self-reports, and monthly interviews. The following variables were assessed: work-related self-efficacy, alliance with SE job coach, and SE service utilization, employment outcomes, quality of life, PTSD and other psychiatric symptoms, trauma related beliefs about self and the world.

Data Analysis: Careful examination of descriptive statistics and the distributional form of all variables will precede statistical analysis. When necessary, mathematical transformations will be used to normalize continuous data or variables will be recoded to an ordinal or dichotomous scale.  The analysis of the results of this study will require many statistical tests of group difference on primary hypotheses and a variety of exploratory analyses.

We expect the sites will differ in some demographic (e.g., more ethnic/racial minorities in the Newark site) and possibly some diagnostic characteristics (e.g., more schizophrenia in some SE programs), but not in the primary outcome measures (e.g., CAPS, employment).  If analyses indicate significant site difference in these measures, tests of the primary hypotheses will include site as a covariate.

a.            Group Equivalence at Baseline. We will evaluate whether the two groups differ on baseline measures of demographic and background factors, key outcome variables, and important covariates using 2 tests, t-tests.

b.            Primary Outcome Analyses.  Three hypotheses are identified as primary.

Primary Hypothesis #1: Clients participating in I-CBT and SE services will have greater rates of employment, hours worked and wages earned than those participating in SE services alone.

For the criterion measure for employment outcome which is a dichotomous variable of whether or not employed in either a part-time or full-time competitive job during the six month and twelve month intervals, the statistical procedures for the analysis of longitudinal categorical data (e.g., PROC GLIMMIX in SAS) will be used for PTSD diagnosis (a dichotomous outcome).  With the continuous variables such as wages earned during the six month and twelve month intervals and , hours worked during the six month and twelve month intervals, t-tests and ANCOVAs will be used to examine the simple treatment effects at each post-treatment assessment point.

Primary Hypothesis #2: Clients participating in I-CBT and SE will have greater engagement in SE services than those participating in SE services alone. The number of no shows within the past 6 months for appointments will be considered as engagement in SE services. t-tests and ANCOVAs will be used to examine the simple treatment effects at each post-treatment assessment point.

Primary Hypothesis #3: Clients participating in I-CBT and SE will report greater self-efficacy toward employment than those participating in SE services alone.  t-tests and ANCOVAs will be used to examine the simple treatment effects at each post-treatment assessment point.

Exploratory Hypothesis #1: Clients in the I-CBT and SE services will be more effective in correcting trauma-related beliefs about self and the world than those receiving SE services alone.  To test this hypothesis, we will use the summary score from the PTCI Total score.  For the PTCI we expect the equivalent groups at baseline to diverge over time and to be statistically different at the post-treatment assessment points.  Following endpoint, t-tests and ANCOVAs will be used to examine the simple treatment effects at each post-treatment assessment point,

Exploratory Hypothesis #2: Clients in the I-CBT and SE services will experience decreasing PTSD symptoms from before treatment to the post-treatment and follow-up assessments compared to those receiving SE services alone.  Two variables from the CAPS will be used, overall severity of PTSD symptoms and the presence/absence of PTSD diagnosis.  Similar procedures will be used as for Exploratory Hypothesis #1, except that statistical procedures for the analysis of longitudinal categorical data (e.g., PROC GLIMMIX in SAS) will be used for PTSD diagnosis (a dichotomous outcome).

Project outcomes: Persons with psychiatric disabilities and PTSD are an underserved and vulnerable population. PTSD in this population is often undiagnosed and treated. This study will provide preliminary data on the effectiveness of the integrated program of CBT and supported employment in addressing PTSD as a hidden barrier to employment for these individuals.

Specific Student Responsibilities:  We would have completed data collection on all subjects by 5/1/19. The data is being entered concurrently. Student will assist with data entry and data analysis, and manuscript preparation. Currently we have two manuscripts under preparation. The student will assist with one of them.
Start / end date of project:  5/15/19 to 8/31/19

Educational:

WHAT OTHER EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES ARE AVAILABLE TO STUDENTS?
(e.g., journal club, seminars, clinic, rounds)
 Student will be exposed to lab meetings, supervision. The student will work with the faculty in analyzing the data and put the data into formatted tables. The student will also learn to put a manuscript together for publication.
WHERE DO YOU PLAN TO PRESENT OR PUBLISH THE FINDINGS WITH THE STUDENT?
(e.g., national or state meetings, newsletter or journal, SHP poster day)
 The student will present his/her findings at state, and national conferences such as NJCA, ABCT, ISTSS, or USPRA conferences. The student will also present at SHP research day along with other students.

Faculty Contact Information:

Faculty Name: Antonina Mitrofanova
Department/Program: Health Informatics, SHP
E-mail: amitrofa@shp.rutgers.edu

Project Detail:

Project Title: (56 characters max) Investigating the role of alternative splicing in lung adenocarcinoma
Hypothesis: We will test the hypothesis that alternative splicing can be used as a marker of progression and treatment response in lung adenocarcinoma patients.
Description:
(Include design, methodology, data collection, techniques, dataanalysis to be employed, evaluation and interpretation methodology  for research component)
Background and Significance: Despite recent advances in discovering a wide array of novel chemotherapy agents, identification of patients with poor and favorable chemotherapy response prior to treatment administration remains a major challenge in clinical oncology and cancer management. As part of this effort, last summer we developed a generalizable computational informatics approach pathCHEMO (i.e., uncovering transcriptomic and epigenomic pathways implicated in CHEMOresistance), which combines transcriptomic (e.g., mRNA expression) and epigenomic (e.g., DNA methylation) patient profiles to unveils molecular pathways that govern chemoresistance in lung adenocarcinoma. In the proposed project, we will extend this work by investigating the role of alternative splicing (which is heavily under-studied in oncology and particularly in therapeutic resistance) as a marker of progression and chemoresponse in lung adenocarcinoma.

Objective: To uncover mechanisms underlying heterogeneity of therapeutic response, we propose to develop an accurate computational pipeline to analyze patterns of alternative splicing and their relationship in cancer progression and treatment response.

Approach and methodology: We will analyze The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) lung adenocarcinoma patient profiles (n = 601) on high-performance computing (HPC) Amarel condominium cluster. To align raw RNA-seq reads to the human genome (hg19), we will utilize STAR (1) aligner v2.5.2a; and subsequently SAMtools (2) v1.3.1. Alternative splicing will be estimated using SUPPA (3) pipeline. We anticipate initial analysis for 601 samples, for which RNAseq data available as a part of TCGA initiative. In addition, we will integrate gene expression, DNA methylation and alternative splicing data types (26,398 genes, 485,577 DNA methylation sites, 10,750 splicing events, for 601 samples) using statistical modeling and subsequent model training and testing using random forest.

Anticipated Outcomes: The proposed study will evaluate the role of alternative splicing in cancer progression and therapeutic response and develop an algorithm to effectively integrate multiomic multi-level mechanisms of therapeutic resistance.

References:
1. Dobin A, Davis CA, Schlesinger F, Drenkow J, Zaleski C, Jha S, Batut P, Chaisson M, Gingeras TR. STAR: ultrafast universal RNA-seq aligner. Bioinformatics. 2013;29(1):15-21. Epub 2012/10/30. doi: 10.1093/bioinformatics/bts635. PubMed PMID: 23104886; PMCID: PMC3530905.

2. Subgroup GPDP, Wysoker A, Handsaker B, Marth G, Abecasis G, Li H, Ruan J, Homer N, Durbin R, Fennell T. The Sequence Alignment/Map format and SAMtools. Bioinformatics. 2009;25(16):2078-9. doi: 10.1093/bioinformatics/btp352.

3. Alamancos GP, Pagès A, Trincado JL, Bellora N, Eyras E. Leveraging transcript quantification for fast computation of alternative splicing profiles. RNA (New York, NY). 2015;21(9):1521-31. Epub 2015/07/17. doi: 10.1261/rna.051557.115. PubMed PMID: 26179515; PMCID: PMC4536314.

Specific Student Responsibilities: Student will be responsible for

  • Downloading raw RNA-seq (i.e., fastq files) files from GDC portal
  • Computational implementation of the proposed algorithm ( R is preferred; MATLAB, C, C++, Java are also acceptable)
  • high-throughput data analysis in Amarel cluster (familiarity with Unix or Linux system)
Start / end date of project: June 3, 2019 – August 10, 2019

Educational:

WHAT OTHER EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES ARE AVAILABLE TO STUDENTS?
(e.g., journal club, seminars, clinic, rounds)
Students will have an opportunity to participate in journal club meetings held in my lab. In addition, student is welcome to attend seminars held at Rutgers and other institutions in the greater NY area (i.e., Columbia University, NY Genome Center, etc).
WHERE DO YOU PLAN TO PRESENT OR PUBLISH THE FINDINGS WITH THE STUDENT?
(e.g., national or state meetings, newsletter or journal, SHP poster day)
We intend to develop and publish results of this project in peerreview journal, such as Cell Reports, Genes and Development, Bioinformatics, or BMC Bioinformatics. This work would also be presented at SHP poster day.

Faculty Contact Information:

Faculty Name: Shashi Mehta, PhD and Dinesh Mital, PhD
Department/Program: Clin Lab & Med Imaging Sci and Biomed Informatics
E-mail: mehtas1@shp.rutgers.edu  

Project Detail:

Project Title: (56 characters max) Hemophilia Drugs: Pharmacokinetic Evaluation by MATLAB
Hypothesis: Pharmacokinetic evaluation of prescribed prophylaxis drugs will provide effective management of hemophilia disorder.
Description:
(Include design, methodology, data collection, techniques, dataanalysis to be employed, evaluation and interpretation methodology  for research component)
Design Methodology: Material inserts and literature articles for 15 prescribed hemophilia drugs will be obtained. A list will be prepared to establish manufacturer’s provided half-life concentrations of administered drugs. All 15 drugs will be tabulated for the following information: Terminal Half-Life, T-Max, C-Max, Volume of Distribution, Clearance Dose and Incremental Recovery. A pharmacokinetic equation will be constructed to evaluate the evaluation of the serum drug concentration at 50% and 90% depletion rate after administration. Subsequently a comparison will be made among studied prophylactic drugs and a conclusion will be drawn to evaluate length of effectiveness of the drug.

Data Collection: MATLAB is a widely used platform and provides a multi-paradigm numerical computing tools to perform the listed tasks. The collected and tabulated data will be subjected to a theoretically constructed equation in MATLAB and plasma drug concentrations will be evaluated at 90% and 50% concentrations for all 15 drugs.

Data Dissemination: Currently such construct comparisons are not available. Our data can allow the visualization of a better lasting drug(s) in an idealized environment. We believe that these results are publishable and can expand to develop a patient based app for mobile applications.

This is a theoretical project based on a valid hypothesis and does not require human specimens. MATLAB software is available to faculty and staff at SHP. The project can be finished in one summer term..

Specific Student Responsibilities: Student Responsibilities:

  • To collect material insert information and review the literature.
  • To prepare a table that will summarize all pharmacokinetic parameters.
  • Pharmacokinetic equation construct will be theorized based on available literature.
  • All 15 drug information will be assessed with MATLAB application.
  • To draw conclusions on the effective choice of drugs for better efficacy.
Start / end date of project: Start: May 28, 2019 End: August 26, 2019

Educational:

WHAT OTHER EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES ARE AVAILABLE TO STUDENTS?
(e.g., journal club, seminars, clinic, rounds)
Student will be able to participate in other research (myeloma and cell morphology image processing) activities.
WHERE DO YOU PLAN TO PRESENT OR PUBLISH THE FINDINGS WITH THE STUDENT?
(e.g., national or state meetings, newsletter or journal, SHP poster day)
Generated data from proposed studies will be written for a publication in a peer reviewed journal in Informatics or Hemophilia. The collected data will also be presented at a National meeting and SHP Research and Scholarship Symposium in 2019.

Faculty Contact Information:

Faculty Name:  Sheena MacFarlane, PT, DPT, CCS
Department/Program:  RMS/DPT-South
E-mail:  Som15@shp.rutgers.edu

Project Detail:

Project Title: (56 characters max)  The Effectiveness of Cycle Ergometry As an Early Mobilization Intervention In Mechanically Ventilated Patients In Acute Care.
Hypothesis: The systematic review will provide research that cycle ergometry is a safe, feasible, and effective early mobility intervention for physical therapist to utilize when treating patients on mechanical ventilators in the intensive care unit (ICU).
Description:
(Include design, methodology, data collection, techniques, dataanalysis to be employed, evaluation and interpretation methodology  for research component)
In the hospital ICU, it is common for critically ill patients on mechanical ventilators to experience muscle weakness and functional impairments; both of which may be caused by immobility (bed rest).  Physical therapy early mobilization has shown promising results at preventing or slowing this muscle weakness.  However, many critically ill patients are unable to participate in traditional physical therapy due to their compromised physiological state, the limitations of the lines, tubes, and machines (including the mechanical ventilator), and/or their altered level of consciousness.  In-bed cycle ergometry is a more recent technology that allows patients to lay supine in their hospital beds and passively or actively cycle.  This allows physical therapist to treat patients earlier in their ICU stay, at or near the beginning of their muscle weakness sequela potentially limiting their functional impairments.  This study is a systematic review with key words: cycle ergometer, AND mechanical ventilation AND Physical Therapy.  It aims to appraise the literature available on this topic to offer summative empirical evidence for physical therapist treating patients on mechanical ventilators in the ICU.  This would potentially also enable hospitals to use these systematic review research findings to justify purchasing an in bed cycle ergometer for utilization with this patient population.
Specific Student Responsibilities: Assist with manuscript preparation
Start / end date of project:  Late May to Mid-August (Flexible based on the student’s schedule and availability during the summer semester)

Educational:

WHAT OTHER EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES ARE AVAILABLE TO STUDENTS?
(e.g., journal club, seminars, clinic, rounds)
 N/A; it is a systematic review
WHERE DO YOU PLAN TO PRESENT OR PUBLISH THE FINDINGS WITH THE STUDENT?
(e.g., national or state meetings, newsletter or journal, SHP poster day)
Acute Care Peer Reviewed Journal: Journal of Acute Care Physical Therapy

National Critical Care Conference: John Hopkins Critical Care Rehabilitation Conference

Faculty Contact Information:

Faculty Name:  Suril Gohel, PhD
Department/Program:  Department of health Informatics
E-mail:  Suril.gohel@rutgers.edu

Project Detail:

Project Title: (56 characters max) Relationship between MRI, fMRI and PET in ADNI DATA
Hypothesis:  We hypothesize that decrease in GMV in Alzheimer’s disease population will be reflected in decreased metabolic activity quantified in PET and decreased BOLD signal power quantified using fMRI images.
Description:
(Include design, methodology, data collection, techniques, dataanalysis to be employed, evaluation and interpretation methodology  for research component)
 The project will continue on the summer research project from 2018 and use the data downloaded from this project.

Student will use the specialized fMRI analysis software based on MATLAB to perform data processing on MRI and fMRI images.  Using this software packages, we will compute grey matter volume, BOLD signal power and metabolic signal from PET. Later student will be perform group level comparison using two sample t-test to identify brain region showing decrease grey matter volume, BOLD signal power and metabolic signal.

Specific Student Responsibilities:  Student will be responsible for analyzing the already downloaded data using SPM and AFNI software.

Student will also perform fMRI analysis and group statistics on the images.

Start / end date of project:  The project will start on July 1st 2018 and End on September 1st 2018

Educational:

WHAT OTHER EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES ARE AVAILABLE TO STUDENTS?
(e.g., journal club, seminars, clinic, rounds)
 Student will attend journal club meeting in Dr Gohel’s Laboratory.
WHERE DO YOU PLAN TO PRESENT OR PUBLISH THE FINDINGS WITH THE STUDENT?
(e.g., national or state meetings, newsletter or journal, SHP poster day)
  The findings will be published at SHP research day in 2020. The findings will also be used to prepare a publication.

Faculty Contact Information:

Date submitted:  4-8-2019
Faculty Name:  Gerard G Fluet DPT, PhD
Department/Program:  RMS / PT North
Telephone number:  (732) 986-8621
E-mail:  fluetege@shp.rutgers.edu

Project Detail:

Project Title: (56 characters max)  Home Based Virtual Rehabilitation for upper extremity
Hypothesis:  Motivational enhancement strategies will have an additive effect on adherence to a program of virtual simulated rehabilitation activities.
Description:
(Include design, methodology, data collection, techniques, dataanalysis to be employed, evaluation and interpretation methodology  for research component)
 The two computer game groups, Motivation Enhanced (ME) and Motivation Non-Enhanced (MnE) will use the NJIT- Home Virtual Rehabilitation System (HoVRS) to play a series of computer games developed to practice movement of the hand and fingers. Subjects will first come into our lab, perform pre-tests as well as a pre-intervention training session. Then a physical therapist and engineer will set up the apparatus in subject’s home and will train them on how to use the system and play the games in their home during the first week. The physical therapist and engineer will be in contact with subjects throughout the training and will visit subjects’ homes as needed if problems are encountered.

In an attempt to expand our understanding of the motivation  and adherence to the autonomous home rehabilitation program, we will perform an in depth qualitative analysis focusing on subjects’ unique perceptions and understandings of their participation in the proposed rehabilitation program. Using a Grounded Theory approach, data collection and analysis will follow these steps: 1) A trained interviewer will ask open-ended questions in a telephone interview conducted after follow up testing, allowing participants to reflect on and describe their experiences. 2) Investigators will read participants’ narratives to develop a general sense of the subjects’ experiences and attitudes toward the rehabilitation program. 3) Investigators will identify emerging narrative themes in participants’ experiences and attitudes toward the program. 4) Finally, an iterative coding process will be used to refine initial findings and synthesize these themes.

Specific Student Responsibilities:  The student intern will be charged with receiving training to perform semi-structured interviews and then scheduling and performing the interviews on approximately 13 subjects.
Start / end date of project:  June and July of 2019

Educational:

WHAT OTHER EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES ARE AVAILABLE TO STUDENTS?
(e.g., journal club, seminars, clinic, rounds)
Student interns will be able to attend measurement,  in home training sessions, and on-line follow-up telerehabilitation sessions related to use of the equipment being trialed. This will give them personal experiences to inform their interviewing.
WHERE DO YOU PLAN TO PRESENT OR PUBLISH THE FINDINGS WITH THE STUDENT?
(e.g., national or state meetings, newsletter or journal, SHP poster day)
 We plan to submit this work as data to support a protocol paper we will write for a larger clinical trial.

Stipends of $1,500 will be awarded to each student who completes an agreed upon project in a six to eight week period during the summer.

Interns must be SHP graduate students, with preference given to students who are less than half way through their Program. Faculty Researchers must have a terminal degree for the research component, however, this criteria is not required for the Scholarly Activity.  Where required, research must be approved by the proper Institutional Review Board.

The Student Research Proposals link will become available in early-2019. The student deadline to contact a faculty regarding a proposal will be in April 2019. More information is forthcoming.

All 2018 summer student internships have been awarded.

2019 Proposals will be posted in April 2019.

Timeline & Forms

    • Official Announcement – March 11, 2019
    • Applications due from Faculty – Project Proposal Form
      – March 26, 2019
    • Research Proposals posted online – April 1, 2019
    • Announcement for Students to review research proposals – April 1, 2019
    • Student/Faculty Interview process and final selection – starts April 1st through April 26th
    • Student/Faculty Final Selection  due to Office of Research –  April 26, 2019
    • Project Commitment Form due from Faculty – May 3, 2019
    • Notification of funding awards – May 10, 2019
        • Letters sent to students/faculty regarding funding status
    • 1st Half funding Application – July 1, 2019
    • Final Abstract due from Faculty upon project completion.
    • 2nd half of funding disbursed upon project completion and receipt of final abstracts

Student Interns for Research and Scholarly Activities

Forms and Applications

1. Procedure for Applying 2019
Please review the procedure outlined to apply to the program.
2. SRIP Timeline 2019

This document outlines the program’s application phase and program phase of the Summer Research Intern Program.

3. Application for Project Proposal Form
This form initiates the process and submits your project proposal / Scholarly Activity for consideration.  It is reviewed by the OR for completeness.  Once approved, it is posted on the OR website for students to view and contact the project director if interested.  All application project proposals are listed online under “Project Proposals” link on top.
 4. Project Commitment Form
This form creates a record and confirms  commitment with a student interested in doing the project. It outlines the project requirements and support needed to complete the project. It is used to track the status of the project and to initiate the 1st payment to the student. Once completed, it is sent electronically to the OR.
5. Final Abstract Form
This form is sent to confirm completion of project and to notify the OR of project closed out.   It provides the OR with a summary of the project requirements and how they have been met.    This form is required in order to submit the 2nd and final payment to the student and to officially close out the project.

Questions? Contact Lisa Adams at kla90@shp.rutgers.edu or 973-972-6524